Images of Loss

Images of Loss Andrea Tsurumi sends this in. I invite others to share. You can comment, but because we never figured out our spam filter, we have to moderate/approve them and that could be only once a day. Or you can email us at thesaw@sequentialartistsworkshop.org and we’ll post the relevant ones on this thread or elsewhere. Thanks, everyone ———————- Here’s an owl typed by our dear friend Maddie. Thank…

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Images of Loss- Calvin and Hobbes

From Robyn Chapman: I saw your post seeking images of loss. Perhaps this one has crossed your mind. And offering it up, I hope it doesn’t sound like I’m trivializing what you’re going through. Even as a pet owner and vegetarian for life, I would never say the death of an animal is the same as the death of a person. It’s the well-known, well-loved Calvin and Hobbes sequence…

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Thanks from Leela and Tom

Dear supporters and curious readers, We want to thank you for all of your support – your words, cards, notes, and sometimes food and always your love- during this painful time. As many of you know, Leela and I lost our precious, amazing, awe-inspiring, life-giving daughter, Rosalie Lightning Corman Hart, earlier this month. We are bereft and devastated. We plan on spending most of December visiting loved ones and…

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SAW space-to-be

We finalized our space and signed off on this great space, a former wood-shop behind the fabulous Civic Media Center, behind a Citizen’s Food co-op (with free coffee), next to the Display Gallery and across from the wild Church of the Holy Colors performance/art space. It’s currently RAW RAW RAW, but will make a great one-room school house, with enough room for our library, tools, a publishing station and…

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Finishing Unterzakhn

Finalizing Unterzakhn, getting the book into InDesign Finalizing some grey tones This is the book that broke the scanner. Crashed it. I mean the scanner fell off the shelf and crashed to the floor. All the remaining scans are coming out all shudderry: Viva la scanner. Viva la Unterzakhn!

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Finishing Unterzakhn 2

Still working on finishing Unterzakhn. Reordering, deleting, cutting, pasting, Leela is busy drawing new panels and pages, Some screen shots: Great dry brush on this vomiting woman. Lee felt the characters needed to be split apart in this panel. Note the profile in the negative space of the last panel. Pretty sure she’s got to draw something there now. Leela inking some hair. I love watching her ink hair.

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Unterzakhn in Progress

Leela has been hard at work finishing Unterzakhn since we relocated to Gainesville. She’s been busy with productions, adding tones, rewrites, re-draws and I’ve been editing, compiling, serving as Walter Murch to her Francis Ford Coppola. This is an accurate analogy. Leela has approached this project very organically, with high degrees of “rehearsal” and improvisation of scenes, until they’ve been right. Some scenes from years ago have been rewritten,…

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Afternoon with Derek Ballard

Leela took a mini-break from Unterzakhn and Tom took a break from you-don’t-want-to-know-what, and we spent the afternoon with Gainesville’s Derek Ballard, (aka The Line Tamer) and looked at his book-in-progress, whose title I forget but the layout comes from those little Peanuts hardcovers you’d get in the 70s. Anyway. His super stylized way of drawing is fascinating. A contrast of angular and cold lines and shapes with robotic/sci-fi…

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Great work from past students!

Hard to keep track of all the great work from my past students, but a few (many are CCS grads for whom I thesis-advised) have crossed my path the past day or two: Melissa Mendes won a Xeric to publish FREDDY STORIES and it’s wonderful. This book is elusive, charming, and odd, like childhood. Go here: http://www.mmmendes.com/freddy/the-book/ The crazy and brilliant Betsey Swardlick wrote a book Colleen Frakes is…

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Karl Stevens’ The Lodger

  Karl Stevens, The Lodger I enjoyed The Lodger book much more than I expected. My reservations were due to Stevens’ abundant allegiance to the photo-realistic moment. Often comics like this are too static, and too difficult to connect with. More often than not for a story to flow, the visuals need room to breathe; there needs to be a stylistic choice to allow space for the reader’s imagination…

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